Glazing Treatments

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Light Redirection

Section Key Resources
  • No publications specific to this section have been listed.
Links
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Lead Author(s): Matthew Tanteri

Light Guiding Shades

Section Key Resources
  • No publications specific to this section have been listed.
Links
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Lead Author(s): Matthew Tanteri

Anidolic devices

Anidolic means “without image”. The origin of the word is from Ancient Greece: “an” (without) + “eidolon” (image). Anidolic Daylighting Systems are a light re-directing technology that utilize non-imaging optics, similar to those used in solar concentrators, to efficiently reflect, collect and distribute diffuse daylight in the form of skylight and reflected light. Their use of “edge ray” geometrical optics reduces reflection and maximizes light collection and throughput.

Anidolic components can be integrated into various types of room and fenestration components such as ceiling and plenum systems, window blinds and light shelves. Anidolic systems offer several advantages:

  • They work well under overcast and partly cloudy skies
  • They are independent of façade orientation when designed for diffuse skylight collection.
  • They increase daylight penetration compared to conventional double glazed windows.

At the same time, they have several disadvantages:

  • They require more space and a more coordinated effort to install as compared to conventional double glazed windows.
  • They are difficult to retrofit into existing facades

It is important to note that Anidolic Daylighting Systems have several important performance characteristics:

  • They are designed for diffuse skylight, not direct sun.
  • They perform best when sky area is matched with the system’s collection angle.


Section Key Resources
  • Anidolic daylighting systems, Solar Energy, Volume 73, Issue 2, August 2002, Pages 123-135 Jean-Louis Scartezzini and Gilles Courre
  • Improving Daylighting in Existing Buildings: Characterizing the Effect of Anidolic System, Siân Kleindienst Dr. Marilyne Andersen Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Proceedings of SOLAR 2006: Renewable Energy - Key to Climate Recovery, Denver, July 7-13, 2006.
Links
  • No links specific to this section have been listed.

Lead Author(s): Matthew Tanteri

Directional Selective Shading Systems

Section Key Resources
  • No publications specific to this section have been listed.
Links
  • No links specific to this section have been listed.

Lead Author(s): Matthew Tanteri

Diffusing Materials

There are several types of materials and surface treatments that be used in an IGU that diffuse transmitted light and provide varying degrees of obscuration or read-through.

Sandblasting is one surface treatment method.

Section Key Resources
  • 4 Lighting Design Considerations
Links
  • No links specific to this section have been listed.

Lead Author(s): Matthew Tanteri

Fritted Glass

Many coatings, surface treatments and processes exist to alter an IGU’s appearance, performance, and attributes. Ceramic enamel frit patterns of dots, lines and custom imagery are currently a popular glazing treatment in commercial buildings. The frit is silk-screened onto the substrate, then fused under high temperature. Opaque frit is available in a variety of colors such as black, blue, white and gray. Translucent frit is available that covers the entire substrate to simulate the diffusion and obscuration of a sandblasted or acid-etched surface, but that are more durable and easier to maintain.

Frit is widely used for aesthetic purposes, however its impact on visual and thermal performance are significant and should be well considered. The use of frit reduces an IGU’s Solar Heat Gain Coefficient (SHGC) due to increased solar absorption. Depending on orientation and climate, the resultant increases in thermal stress and risk of breakage requires that the substrate by either heat strengthened or tempered. Frit also lowers an IGU’s Visible Transmittance (VT), requiring an increase in glazing area to provide an equivalent amount of light as a non-fritted unit. (See Effective Aperture) More importantly, light color frit in full sunlight is often a source of glare to building occupants, prompting the deployment of interior shading, or some other shading measure, and thereby defeating daylight harvesting.

Section Key Resources

Lead Author(s): Matthew Tanteri

Electrically Controlled Glazing

Section Key Resources
  • No publications specific to this section have been listed.
Links
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Lead Author(s): Matthew Tanteri

Spectrally Selective Transmitting Materials

Low-E coatings on tinted glass play an important role in thermal performance by possessing high visible light transmission and low heat transfer properties. What's more, Low-E coatings on tinted glass reduce glare.

Section Key Resources
  • No publications specific to this section have been listed.
Links
  • No links specific to this section have been listed.

Lead Author(s): Matthew Tanteri

Specular Reflectors

Section Key Resources
  • No publications specific to this section have been listed.
Links
  • No links specific to this section have been listed.

Lead Author(s): Matthew Tanteri

Translucent Insulation Materials

Section Key Resources
  • No publications specific to this section have been listed.
Links
  • No links specific to this section have been listed.

Lead Author(s): Matthew Tanteri

Transparent High/Low Transmittance Materials

Section Key Resources
  • No publications specific to this section have been listed.
Links
  • No links specific to this section have been listed.

Lead Author(s): Matthew Tanteri

Page Key Resources
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Citations
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