Programming and Organization

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Programming

Example space relation ship diagrams. Conventional diagram on the left, space relationship diagram with daylighting considerations on the right. Source: Electric Power Research Institute, 1997. Permission Pending.

It is important to incorporate daylighting very early in the design process starting with predesign programming of the buildings and the spaces. Include daylighting criteria early in the design process to get buy-in from the building owner and users, and encourage communication between the various design disciplines.

During the programming stage, decide where daylighting is desirable and feasible, and incorporate daylighting criteria in to the building program documents. Decide whether a sidelighting or toplighting strategy is more appropriate for each space. Spaces that need to be daylit need to be located on the building perimeter or have access to the roof for toplighting. Create space relationships diagrams that incorporate these daylighting criteria. In some cases, it is important to set a goal for overall floor area, or occupied floor area that will have access to daylight. In addition, the detailed programming document can also set space-by-space goals for access to daylight.

Section Key Resources
  • Electric Power Research Institute. 1997. Daylighting Design Smart and Simple.
  • Robbins, C. 1986. Daylighting Design and Analysis. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.
Links

Lead Author(s): Prasad Vaidya

Building Organization

Following the programming exercise for daylight, develop a space relationship diagram for the building that indicates spaces that need access to the perimeter windows and those that need access to toplighting. Design the building shape to take advantage of façade orientations. Deep and tall spaces are best located on the north, locating them on the south requires attention to shading. Shallow spaces and small rooms can be located on the east and west facades. Daylight penetrates only up to 2.5 times the head height of the window; so the depth of daylight zones is restricted by the floor to ceiling height of the space. Organize the building with a stacking diagram that indicates daylight access through skylights and roof monitors. Many buildings can be designed successfully for daylight with long narrow floorplates with the long sides facing north and south, and oriented to face the cardinal directions.


Section Key Resources
  • Electric Power Research Institute. 1997. Daylighting Design Smart and Simple.
  • Moore, F. 1985. Concepts and Practice of Architectural Daylighting. New York. Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.
  • Robbins, C. 1986. Daylighting Design and Analysis. New York: Van Nostrand Reinhold Company.
  • Hopkinson, R. 1966. Daylighting. London: William Heinemann Ltd.
Links
  • No links specific to this section have been listed.

Lead Author(s): Prasad Vaidya

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  • No publications general to this page have been listed.
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